a journal of our edible education

season

Seeds in Pots

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The beginning of every academic year is a bit like a stumbling sprint. Parents, students and teachers alike find getting back into the groove of school a bit of a challenge. There is a lot to do and there isn’t much time to ramp up. You’ll sharpen your pencil twice and it’s Christmas.  A school garden is no exception. If your garden is like ours, you may find August pretty daunting. In Florida, summer heat and rains usually give us an overgrown tangle of vines and weeds as a back to school present. Even with attention over summer break there are some plants that just aren’t ready to be yanked out to make room for the fall and winter crops. If you planted crowder peas, watermelon or sweet potatoes just before school let out in May, these varieties are still going strong when students return. Couple this with the fact that August is the most brutal month to be outside in Florida and you can see why it’s tempting to just look the other way. Fortunately there is something that can be done (even indoors) to get some cool weather plants off to a healthy and timely start. Seeds in pots. At OJA we try to plant the bulk of our winter crops in small pots during the first few weeks of school. This allows us to make a start on the new garden while we let the old garden wind down. We have found that many seeds in the Brassica family (kale, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower etc.) do well when started this way.  It might seem premature to start thinking about winter crops now when a trip to the mailbox requires sunscreen, but like I said: “Christmas is coming”. Planting seeds in pots, rather than directly in the ground, offers other advantages as well.

A tray of of potted seedlings is much easier to manage than a twenty-foot row.

It’s much easier to avoid accidentally stepping on a baby cabbage if it’s in a pot.

For some reason slugs and cut worms seem to be deterred by the three inch climb.

Most importantly, planting our first seeds in pots, indoors, buys us time.  By mid September the seedlings will need to be transplanted into the ground and the more challenging work of gardening will begin. The garden has already started but we still have time.  We still have time to pull out weeds and decide where the beds will be laid out. We still have time to discuss garden protocol and outdoor learning expectations. We still have time to plan, time to imagine. We still have time to get back into the groove of school.

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Tempis Fugit

Time runs from us. It usually takes off in a sprint while we’re looking the other way.  Moments quickly pass through our fumbling fingers and we rarely take notice.  We’re drawn to details that seem permanent and ageless because they help distract us from the uncomfortable ticking clock.  In reality though, building our lives around this distraction is a trap of denial.  You can’t stop that clock, no more than you can stop that beautiful sunset.  Ironically, part of what makes that sunset so great is that it runs away and doesn’t last.  It’s unfortunate that we sometimes associate the temporal with the disposable.  We question the value of things that don’t last. In our disposable culture that’s usually a reasonable question, but a sunset is not a paper plate.  A melting snowflake is not a plastic fork.  The natural world is full of the temporal that calls our attention to time not away from it.  For some, the seasons are a drastic reminder of how nature seems to celebrate time.  Floridians, however, have to look a little closer.  So much of our landscapes here have been designed to appear unchanging.  While pursuing the holy grail of the “maintenance-free yard”, we have wound up with an environment that looks pretty much the same in January as it does in July.  What a shame.  The passage of time should be celebrated.  Poppies can help. They don’t last. Look the other way and you’ll miss the party.

Poppies 2014

IMG_3921IMG_3910Scatter poppy seeds in the Fall and you’ll notice when Spring arrives.